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#1 Lt Col Stephen Reny stephenreny@hotmail.com  2016-05-11 14:25
This aircraft was flown by Maj Gen Paul Johnson in Operation Desert Storm and was hit by a Surface to Air Missile (SA-6). Here is a link to the article: www.airforcemag.com/MagazineArchive/Documents/2010/December%202010/1210hog.pdf According to Walter J. Boyne, Air Force Magazine, "Johnson was hit by enemy fire while trying to attack a SAM site in poor weather. His A-10 was hit on egress, after he had concluded—five minutes too late by his estimation—that he
would not be able to take out his target. “I looked out the cockpit to the right and got a cold chill,” he told Smallwood after the war. “I could see hydraulic lines sticking up out of the right wing, a little bit of flame over the top of the wing, and a big gaping hole in the leading edge with some of the top wing skin gone. … It was an ugly sight.” The right landing gear’s housing was shot away, and the right engine had ingested some of the debris, spit it back out, and kept running. The explosion had destroyed one of his two hydraulic systems, and Johnson was still loaded up with live ordnance. He managed to bring the damaged Hog 12 miles back to Saudi Arabian airspace, and then refueled the battered A-10 in flight. With a fresh load of fuel, he pressed on to KKMC, still 50 miles distant. Johnson’s next worry was whether or not the wing would stay attached when he lowered the landing gear. He had no way of knowing how extensive the damage was, and was concerned that the additional drag of the extended gear would overstress the wing. Fortunately, the gear went down without incident. Johnson flew a no-flap approach and made a smooth landing, even though a tire, almost certainly damaged by the flak, shredded upon
touchdown."

See Maj Gen Johnson's interview about the this mission and the one he flew earlier to save a downed F-14 Pilot, which earned him the Air Force Cross.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=O15OmJcr90c
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