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Submitting Your Own Information

Do you have any interesting details or stories of this particular aircraft or aircraft type? Did you fly or maintain it during its active service? We are trying to build a database of information on all the aircraft that have passed through AMARC to provide our visitors with another perspective of these fine aircraft. If you can help please fill the boxes below with your details and any information you can provide us with.

 

 

Comments  

 
#6 JORGE MANUEL RIVADENEYRA CHAVIERI rivach7878@yahoo.com  2006-05-22 00:00
TECNICO ESPECIALISTA EN ASIENTOS DE EJECCION CALIFICADO COMPA�IA MARTIN BACKER RETIRADO DE LA FUERZA AEREA DEL PERU INTERESADO TRABAJO A TIEMPO COMPLETO
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#5 Robert West Arigizmo1@cs.com  2006-04-04 00:00
The T-37 will always have a place in my heart. I was a crew chief at Williams AFB in the mid-sixties. One day a pilot landed and stepped out of the plane soaked in sweat. Off handedly I asked what made him perspire so freely while flying the Tweet. He said "You want to find out"? Somewhat taken aback, I whispered "Yeah". He issued the challenge. If I went through, and passed the physiological training course, he would take me up and show me what makes a guy sweat in a Tweet. So during the Christmas break I enrolled in the course. (I wanted this ride) Well, the "Boom Bucket" ride, (Willy had the 105' ejection seat tower then) was literally a kick in the seat. The altitude chamber was a lesson and a half and the parachute landing technique was fun. Armed with my new certificate cards, I awaited the Captains next flight in one of our flight's planes. It came soon enough. We went up. I got stick time and he put me through some aerobatics. I learned about sweating, but I would not trade that flight for all the gold I could carry. I wish I knew the tail number of that little bird, but I was so jazzed I forgot get it.
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#4 K. Mike Wood   2006-03-10 00:00
I flew this jet to Davis Monthan on August 20, 2003 in formation with another T-37 from Laughlin. 3530 had been parked at Laughlin for several months awaiting transfer to AMARC. It flew like a dream from DLF to ELP then on to DMA. My biggest regret is that I didn't have time to fly until the disco lights flashed before turning it in to AMARC. I had to put it on the ground with over 500lbs to meet their arrival time restrictions. Walking away from a perfectly good Tweet was very much like shooting your best hunting dog for no good reason!! They ruined my hearing, but I miss flying and teaching in these jets.
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#3 Jeff Fagan comsar@aol.com  2004-11-20 00:00
I flew this jet a number of times as a member of the 84th and 85th Flying Training Squadrons at Laughlin from 1997 through 2000. The Tweet was a great jet to fly. Humbling at times, yet very forgiving.
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#2 Kevin Merritt km1219@txstate.edu  2004-09-13 00:00
I worked that tweet and many others from may 89 to nov 98. I loved working them. They were challenging, but they could take anything a student could dish out including many belly up landings. It sure is sad to see them there, knowing that they are now resigned to the history books.
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